Long term effects of ecstasy on the body (INFOGRAPHIC)

How does ecstasy affects the body? Check on the visual damage that MDMA can cause here in this infographic. Then, we invite you to LIKE < SHARE < OR PRINT the graphic for use in school or office.

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Long term effects of ecstasy on the body

After taking MDMA, effects start approximately 90 minutes later and can last up to 6 hours. Although ecstasy is known for euphoria, what negative effects can occur when you start to roll? We explore here.

Serious effects ecstasy has on the brain

Long term effects of ecstasy on the body (INFOGRAPHIC)

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  • can damage serotonin producing neurons
  • catatonic stupor
  • convulsions
  • depersonalization
  • depression
  • hallucinations
  • insomnia
  • memory impairment
  • panic attacks and severe anxiety
  • significantly changes the regulation of mood, aggression and sleep

Additional effects of ecstasy on the brain

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  • aggression
  • drug cravings
  • heightened libido
  • mood swings
  • restlessness

Possible damage to the cardiovascular system

  • increased blood pressure

Possible damage to the ear, nose, throat

  • increased coughing reflex
  • infection of nasal blood cells
  • pain in the nasal area
  • post nasal drip (after snorting)

Possible damage to the eyes

  • blurred vision
  • double vision
  • increased light sensitivity

Possible damage to the heart

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  • arrhythmia
  • cardiac toxicity
  • heart failure
  • tachycardia

Possible damage to the kidneys

  • kidney failure
  • renal impairment

Possible damage to the liver

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  • acute liver damage

Possible damage to the lungs

  • decreased lung function
  • increased breathing rate
  • pneumomediastinum (if snorted)
  • pulmonary hypertension

Possible damage to the mouth

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  • acute liver failure
  • bruxism (grinding teeth)
  • changes in the mucus secretion
  • dental erosion
  • xerostomia (dry mouth)
About the author
Lee Weber is a published author, medical writer, and woman in long-term recovery from addiction. Her latest book, The Definitive Guide to Addiction Interventions is set to reach university bookstores in early 2019.

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