Long term effects of Xanax on the brain (INFOGRAPHIC)

Xanax cause serious damages on the brain. In this infographic, we present all the long term effects and typical doses of use and abuse. If this looks helpful to you, please spread the word with your colleagues and friends by sharing it on your networks.

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Long term effects of Xanax on the brain

The effects of Xanax on the brain vary from mild impairment of task performance to hypnosis. What are the possible long term effects of Xanax on the brain? More here.

Specific long term effects on the brain

Possible damage to behavior – paradoxical excitation, irritability, aggressive behavior, unusual mood-swings, anxiety, agitation, unusual risk-taking behavior.

Long term effects of Xanax on the brain (INFOGRAPHIC)

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Possible damage to the nervous system – Central Nervous System (CNS) seizures, coma, depressed levels of consciousness, sleep apnea syndrome, stupor.

Possible damage to the neurotransmitters – brain receptors lose sensitivity, increases dopamine levels, modulates the effect of GABA-A receptors, modulates the effect of GABA-ergic neurons.

Possible damage to the personality – forgetfulness, nervousness, no fear of danger, restlessness, talkativeness.

Possible psychological damage – depersonalization, depression, hallucinating, nightmares and abnormal dreams, suicidal actions, suicidal thoughts.

What are the typical doses?

Therapeutic doses

  • adults …………… 0.25mg-1mg daily

Abuse typical doses

  • per day recreationally …… 2-4mg

Lethal typical doses

  • overdose ………… >195 mg/kg *
  • overdose …………… very high doses up to 2000mg**

* 975 times the maximum recommended daily human dose of 10 mg/day)

**less if mixed with alcohol

How long is “long term”?

Long term use of Adderall is daily use of 4mg for about 12 weeks or more. Chronic use of Adderall = Repetitive pattern of Xanax use/abuse that negatively affects your:

  • financial stability
  • health status
  • social life
About the author
Lee Weber is a published author, medical writer, and woman in long-term recovery from addiction. Her latest book, The Definitive Guide to Addiction Interventions is set to reach university bookstores in early 2019.
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