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1-888-882-1456
HOW OUR HELP LINE WORKS
For those seeking addiction treatment for themselves or a loved one, the AddictionBlog.org helpline is a private and convenient solution. Caring advisors are standing by 24/7 to discuss your treatment options.
Calls to any general helpline (non-facility specific 1-8XX numbers) for your visit (IP: 2600:100e:b108:ac40:13:b0ef:f03f:563a) will be answered by American Addiction Centers (AAC) or a paid sponsor.
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The Crack Withdrawal Timeline Chart

The Crack Withdrawal Timeline Chart

Duration of Crack Withdrawal

Are you or a loved one are addicted to crack and looking to quit? You’re in the right place!

Here, we review the main timeline of events as crack starts to leave your body. How long does withdrawal from crack last?  The entire process can take 3-4 weeks and can include extremely uncomfortable symptoms, especially regarding mood. You can expect to feel a combination of depression, fatigue, and anxiety.

During the process, common symptoms of crack withdrawal can appear at roughly the same intervals. However, withdrawal differs from person-to-person, so there will be variations in symptom appearance and intensity. Ready to learn more?

Explore our infographic here. And, if you need more information, please leave your comments and questions at the end. We’ll try to respond personally and promptly to all legitimate questions.

The Intensity of Crack Withdrawal

For most people, crack withdrawal symptoms appear withing the first couple of hours after intake. In fact, as soon as the effects of cocaine wear off, users experience detox. This acute withdrawal period can last for few days up to weeks. However – as mentioned above – each individual experiences withdrawal differently.  The severity, intensity, and length of a person’s withdrawal are due to many contributing factors, including:

  • your age
  • duration of crack use
  • frequency of crack use
  • your general health
  • the human body itself

Crack Withdrawal Timeline

What can you expect during crack withdrawal? Common time periods and associated symptoms follow.

0-72 hours after last dose:

  • Anxiety
  • Depression
  • Fatigue
  • Intense Cravings
  • Sleep disorders
  • Suicidal thoughts

4-7 days after last dose:

  • Compulsive behavior
  • Disorientation
  • Irritability
  • Impulsiveness
  • Mood swings
  • Vivid dreams

Week 2 after last dose:

  • Cravings
  • Hostility
  • Irritability
  • Increased appetite
  • Mood swings
  • Sleep disorders

Week 3 after last dose:

  • Sleep disorders
  • Irritability
  • Decreased cravings
  • Feeling better

Week 4 after last dose:

  • Optimism
  • Confidence
  • Mood stabilization
  • Sleep stabilization

Cocaine post acute withdrawal syndrome, or PAWS

Furthermore, long-term crack users may undergo post acute withdrawal syndrome (PAWS). These specific withdrawal symptoms may persist for months after the last dose, and they include:

  • Anxiety
  • Depression
  • Fatigue
  • Insomnia

Is there a safe way to withdraw from crack? The best and the SAFEST way is to enroll into residential rehab facility, where trained medical staff can make the withdrawal process more manageable and comfortable . To sum up, they take care of you!

Crack Withdraw Timeline Questions

If you or a loved one are ready to get help for crack addiction, contact us today at 1-877-959-4998. We can help you explore you explore your treatment options, and connect you with a rehab program that meets your individual needs. The helpline is:

FREE
CONFIDENTIAL
AVAILABLE 24/7

If you still have questions about crack withdrawal, don’t hesitate to ask in the comments section below. We’ll try to respond promptly and personally. Also, if you like the infographic feel free to share it or use it. The embed code is right after the image.

Reference Sources:  NCBI: Cocaine and Psychiatric Symptoms
Veteran’s Affairs: Treatment of Acute Intoxication and Withdrawal from Drugs of Abuse
NHTSA: Cocaine
Leave a reply

Karen
Sunday, May 13th, 2018

I am on 60mls. Of methadone a day, 6 dhydrocodine 30 mgs tablets and 4 diazepam 2 mg tablets everyday. I have been smoking crack for about 2 yrs it's only the past year it's been more regular especially past 6 mnths.I smoke usually a .4 of a gram everynight never ever during day sometimes more depending on my cash situation.do u think my withdrawals will not be as bad cause I'm on 3 different medications
Lydia @ Addiction Blog
Monday, May 14th, 2018

Hi Karen. That's a lot of mixing. Maybe the best choice for you is to enroll into a rehab facility. Call the helpline you see on the website to get in touch with a trusted treatment consultant.
Katherine
Tuesday, May 15th, 2018

Hi I have recently had a relaspes after 7+ years of total sobriety. Then 4 weeks ago I went on a 9 days straight binge I was on a lot of heavy drugs(opioids/crack/coke/weed/. I spent 2.460$$ in 9 days!! Only slept 7-8hrs the whole time. I have gastrointestinal problems. I was taken off my Diludid 8mg tabs 3x a day and put on methadone. I was up to 90mls and I'm down to 30mls.My problem is that I have been having craving for pills/crack/fentenyl and I am worried I'm going to fall back into the drugs. Why is this happening again? I thought I had it beat,under control. Can you give me some ideas/guidance and advise on any help counseling that I would benefit from. I live in Ontario Canada. Any help is appreciated.
Lydia @ Addiction Blog
Wednesday, May 16th, 2018

Hi Katherine. I suggest that you seek an addiction therapist as soon as possible before you get caught into the cycle of addiction again.