Tuesday September 26th 2017

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The Meth Withdrawal Timeline Chart

The Meth Withdrawal Timeline Chart

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Duration Of Meth Withdrawal

Q: How long does it take to withdraw from meth?
A: Meth withdrawal will vary person-by-person. In fact, each detox manifests different symptoms and will last different amounts of time. Generally, this time period depends on the level of dependence and frequency of meth use.

We explain more about how long do withdrawal symptoms from meth last below. Plus, you’ll find an easy-to-follow timeline in our visual presentation. If you find it educational, please feel free to share it, or use it! Then, we invite you to post your questions or comments about meth withdrawal at the end. In fact, we try to answer your real life question(s) personally and promptly!

Meth Withdrawal Timeline

Meth withdrawal can be severe, harsh, and very uncomfortable… BUT it won’t last forever! Symptoms occur within a few hours after the intake of the last methamphetamine dose. Generally, withdrawal from meth lasts from 1 to 2 weeks, up to a month or more (in some extreme cases).

Here’s a common timeline of meth withdrawal with detailed symptoms to easily guide you on what to expect.

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24-72 hours after last meth dose:

  • Depression
  • Exhaustion
  • Hallucinations
  • Panic
  • Paranoia
  • Suicidal thoughts
  • Anxiety
  • Sleepiness

4-7 days of Meth Withdrawal Symptoms:

  • Aches & pains
  • Agitation
  • Cravings
  • Hunger
  • Irritability
  • Mood swings

Week 2 Methamphetamine Withdrawal:

  • Cravings
  • Depression
  • Mood swings
  • Sleep disorders

Week 3-4 Withdraw Symptoms from Meth:

  • Anxiety
  • Depression
  • Energy regain
  • Fatigue
  • Improved sleep
  • Increased appetite
  • Mood stabilization
  • Nervousness

How Long To Withdraw From Meth?

Withdrawal from meth is most severe and intense in the acute phase of withdrawal, reaching its peak during the first 24 hours and fading out by the first week of the last meth intake. On one hand, physical symptoms resolve quickly. On the other hand, cravings are present during the whole meth withdrawal process and are often the biggest obstacle to recovery.

NOTE HERE: Some meth users may undergo withdrawal symptoms for months. This period is known as post-acute withdrawal syndrome (PAWS), and these symptoms include:

  • Anxiety
  • Cravings
  • Depression
  • Mood swings

Prolonged meth withdrawal can last up to six months or more. So, it’s best to seek medical help during withdrawal from meth in order to receive psychological and emotional support that fits your needs. Even though meth withdrawal symptoms can persist and affect your mood… you are not alone, and with strong supports, you can walk the road of recovery!

Meth Withdrawal Timeline Questions

If you or someone you love has been displaying any of the above symptoms of meth withdrawal, there is something you can do. Call 1-877-845-1107 to receive more information and potential treatment options.

Got any questions? Feel free to leave them in the section below. We try to respond to all legitimate questions promptly and personally.

Reference Sources: NCBI: Withdrawal symptoms in abstinent methamphetamine-dependent subjects
MethHelp: Meth withdrawal
NCBI: The nature, time course and severity of methamphetamine withdrawal
NCBI: Withdrawal symptoms in abstinent methamphetamine-dependent subjects
ND Meth Summit

Leave a Reply

16 Responses to “The Meth Withdrawal Timeline Chart
Dave
7:21 pm April 24th, 2017

I’ve used small amounts of ice of and on for about 6 days will I experience withdrawal symptoms from this….it was my first time using this drug

Daniel
12:05 am April 25th, 2017

Dec 3, 2016 I quit cold turkey. After 5+ years of everyday use. I QUIT…… Today’s date Is April 25, 2017. I’M STILL CLEAN!! All it takes is to REALLY want to quit. I quit alone. You can do it to

Lydia @ Addiction Blog
11:12 am April 25th, 2017

Hi Dave. Meth affects each person differently. There are many cases that some experienced withdrawal symptoms only after using few doses of meth. I suggest that you speak with a pharmacist to recommend some over-the-counter aid just in case.

Lydia @ Addiction Blog
5:32 pm April 26th, 2017

Hi Daniel. Thank you for sharing! Stay strong!

Steve
7:51 pm April 26th, 2017

I have been using ice or meth for about a year now it started out every now and then and increased its use to about 4 or 5 times a week this is all been mainly snorting until Monday night injected I became very sick and I feel like I’ve reached rock bottom and needs to stop my problem is no one in my family knows and I dread letting them know what can I do

Angie
9:47 am April 27th, 2017

I use meth every day, but only for functionality purposes while at work, and recreational purposes while at home (even though I don’t really get “high” anymore).

I want to quit more than anything but I lack the will power to do it on my own…. i believe treatment is the only way I’ll be successful, but wouldn’t that be grounds for termination by my employer? Or, as an addict seeking cessation, am I protected with some sort confidentiality/non-disclosure clause? I love my job but I want to get better! :(

Btw, Daniel, that is so incredible, congratulations man! You are exceptional and inspirational.

Lydia @ Addiction Blog
11:53 am May 11th, 2017

Hi Angie. The safest and the best way to end meth addiction is under medical supervision with a trained staff that can give you all support you need. I suggest that you call the number you see on the website to get in touch with a trusted treatment consultant who can help you find the best treatment that suits your needs. Also, download our free e-book ‘The Definitive Guide To Drug Testing’ to learn more about the essentials of an addiction treatment program, here: http://addictionblog.org/ebooks/the-definitive-guide-to-rehab/

Lydia @ Addiction Blog
11:42 am May 16th, 2017

Hi Steve. Meth withdrawal symptoms are harsh, severe, and they may be very uncomfortable. If you want to detox at home, you’ll need support and help from a very close friend/and or family member, or even somebody that has already an experience with the withdrawal process. Experts claim that the safest way to end meth addition is under medical supervision. I suggest that you call the helpline on the website to speak with a trusted treatment consultant who can help you find the best rehab program just for you. The number is free, confidential, and available 24/7.

James
4:08 am June 15th, 2017

My experiences closely mirror Daniels, I just stopped. However, I had to lose my business (which was successful for eight years), lose all of my possessions, become homeless, and move five states away to live with my mother first.
I wanted to quit for a while, but it was always around, people always were stopping by my house, often to get me high.
The KEY to quitting, for me, was removing myself from the temptation, changing the environment.
Two and a half years clean now, I’ve never asked anybody if they know anyone, not being around it makes it easy. Especially when you see its destroying you, and you want to stop.
You can do it! You’re worth the effort, take your life back and enjoy it!

Lydia @ Addiction Blog
5:28 pm June 15th, 2017

Thanks for sharing your story, James. Stay strong!

Evan
6:43 pm June 26th, 2017

I’m in the 90-100 day mark and I still have anxiety and social problems but physically I’m doing much better and to someone who is considering help you can do it. Crystal made me see a lot of things in life I would of rather not seen the lies, the usery, the girls selling themselves for more of it the guys becoming abusive to their families and friends, people resorting to crime and carrying guns and such it is a terrible drug. Do yourself a favor and don’t let curiosity or stupidity get you don’t do it in the first place. my memory is barely usable at this point in my life all the drugs and such has made life even harder. perseverance is key

Lydia @ Addiction Blog
10:45 am June 30th, 2017

Hi Evan. Thank you for sharing your opinion. I totally agree with you. Don’t let curiosity get to you!

Jess
4:04 am July 10th, 2017

I have been using meth off and on for about 2 and a half months. I recently went on a 4 day Binge and then tried weaning myself off for a day or two. I haven’t used in 3 days but I look and feel like hell. I’m terribly depressed, I fall asleep sitting up, my body feels like I’ve been hit by a Mack truck, I feel like crying at the drop of a hat, I’m withdrawn, anti social and I keep getting heartburn. Do you think this is meth withdrawal? If so, is there anything I can get OTC to help ease the symptoms or at least hurry them along? And if I do meth again what happens to the withdrawal symptoms?… Meaning will they worsen?
Oh, and seeking medical assistance is not an option!

Lydia @ Addiction Blog
5:47 pm July 11th, 2017

Hi Jess. It seems to me that you are experiencing meth withdrawal. If you want to quit meth, then don’t use it. Maybe you should think about getting help.

Abbo
1:33 pm July 23rd, 2017

25yrs everyday maybe a year because of jail I been to re habs,jail ,12steps I can sleep for months stayed clean 10mths never felt good Its got me i don’t feel nothing but pain I wished I never seen myth I do it to survive it’s not a life I reccomend

Lydia @ Addiction Blog
12:42 pm July 28th, 2017

Thank you for sharing, Abbo.

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