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Long term effects of methadone on the body (INFOGRAPHIC)

Long term effects of methadone on the body (INFOGRAPHIC)

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How does methadone work?

Methadone, an opiate analgesic medication, works in the brain to change how the body feels and reacts to pain. Because of this property, methadone is usually prescribed to people who suffer from chronic and strong pain. Its other use may be even more well know: for the treatment of opioid addicted individuals during withdrawal or as a maintenance therapy.

Consequences of methadone abuse on the body

Many patient’s lives have been changed or became functional again thanks to methadone therapy. The efficacy of methadone has been well documented. However, because it is an opiate, many people abuse it to get high and feel relaxed. The risks and dangers are increased when methadone is taken illegally or purchased on the streets. Here are the possible side-effects from taking methadone without being prescribed, more than prescribed or more frequently:

  • coma (in case of overdose)
  • constipation
  • death (in case of overdose)
  • difficulty urinating
  • headaches
  • low blood pressure
  • nausea
  • respiratory depression
  • sexual dysfunction
  • skin problems
  • sleep irregularities
  • sweating
  • vomiting
  • weight gain

Are methadone’s effects on the body reversible?

As mentioned above, street methadone is very dangerous. Firstly because it can be a concentrated amount that is more potent that what is expected, and not only do high doses bring adverse effects, but they can cause permanent damages, coma or death as a result of extreme respiratory depression.

Moreover, if high doses of methadone are used for a prolonged period of time and are taken chronically, the damage caused to the kidneys, heart, brain, and lungs can be permanent.

Adverse effect of methadone on the body questions

If you or someone you love are abusing methadone, suddenly stopping will take you through withdrawal. You need to keep in mind that a thorough detox is important before a person can start a drug rehab program. If you have any questions about the long term effects of methadone addiction treatment, feel free to post them in the comments section below and we’ll gladly reply to all legitimate inquiries.

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17 Responses to “Long term effects of methadone on the body (INFOGRAPHIC)
Debbie
6:41 pm February 16th, 2016

My brother is 40 years old and has been on methadone for 9 years. He weighs over 350 lbs and is going through abrupt detox. How long should it take for his system to get rid of the drug and is there any herbal relief I can get for him while he is going through this hell??? He is aware of the risks, however, since my mother passed away, he no longer can afford the treatment doses from the clinic!!! Help!!!

Lydia @ Addiction Blog
3:54 pm February 19th, 2016

Hi, Debbie. I’m really sorry for your loss… I suggest you call the helpline displayed on our site, and contact our trusted treatment providers.

Shelly
8:59 pm July 15th, 2016

I’m on 30 milligrams of methadone for about 4 months. Started detoxing 2milligrams every 2 weeks.on 26 milligrams now. I want off as quickly as possible, and without much withdraw,for I get anxiety easily.how should I do this detox properly?thank you.Desperate Shelly

ush
5:48 am July 25th, 2016

am so sorry for u debbie,i live in mauritius,i have been on methadone for almost 4 years.and i had various other health problems as well.it is free in my country but the new government is planning to eradicate it.it has really affected my life in the sense that i no longer take heroin no longer have to go to work for that.but im so ill.i cough blood i have ulcer…my mother already treats me badly so i dnt eat,,and now + this therapy,,,i feel sick and low and my feet r swollen holding water,my heart is diseased,sometimes i wish i had died of a drug overdose instead of coming on methadone coz i did everything right but did not get a stable someone in my life,and am nothaving my menses..

Lydia @ Addiction Blog
6:07 pm July 26th, 2016

Hi Shelly. I suggest you speak with your doctor to help you create an individualized tapering schedule. Also, consult with a pharmacist to recommend some over-the-counter medication that can ease withdrawal symptoms.

carmen
6:15 am July 28th, 2016

My 50 year old daughter died on Xmas day 2015. The coroner could not determine the cause of death and an autopsy was performed. The result was determined to be accidental cocaine overdose. The report states that the amount of cocaine in her system was 110ng/ml. The amount of methadone in her system was 1200 ng/ml. which to me is an obvious overdose of methadone. My daughter was on a methadone program since 1988. They raised her mg. at will. She was on 180 mg when she died.. She never used illegal methadone . i begged her to make them wean her off . I believe she was given meth too long. her dose was so high she was like avegetable.. I had to take care of her like she was an invalid. Why would a coroner say cocaine was the cause of death when such a large amount of methadone was in her system. She was on the program 28 years off and on. Is that normal?

jen
5:12 pm August 5th, 2016

ive been on methadone for 16 years and have never relapsed on pain pills. i consider myself a life-er. i have no desire to stop. ive heard of a treatment that they put you to sleep strip all methadone from your system and when you wake up your clean and dont want it anymore. how does that cover thye mental addiction? that is my problem with all systems of getting clean due to the shear horrific things my brain has been thru which cause my addiction to start with. self medicating

Lydia @ Addiction Blog
1:07 pm August 10th, 2016

Hi Carmen. I’m really sorry for your loss… May your heart and soul find peace and comfort. I’d suggest that you speak with a toxicologist or another medical professional about your concerns. We’re not able to provide you with a qualified response.

5:19 pm August 22nd, 2016

Hi Jen. I believe you’ve heard of quick detox processes that are performed under strict medical care. They are not recommended unless you need to be immediately taken off methadone for some reason. Otherwise, tapering off and slowly lowering your tolerance is always the recommended way to do it. Regarding the part that you juts wake up and no longer have the substance in your system – that is true. However, the part about not needing/wanting it anymore is far from real. Just because your body is clean from all traces of methadone, it doesn’t mean your brain hasn’t gotten used to the presence of it. That is why people who use opiates for a long time experience cravings even when they haven’t taken any for months.

My suggestion is that you speak with a doctor, get a tapering plan in place and follow it, be prepared with over-the-counter medications and other remedies for when symptoms start to appear. Of course, you can keep in touch with your doctor and seek any additional medical help should the need arise. I also suggest you get a psychologist’s or a counselor’s help and support.

Tina
6:16 pm August 23rd, 2016

I’m decreasing from methadone down to55mgs.want to switch to suboxone or subutex how far down do u have to come f own?

1:16 pm August 24th, 2016

Hi Tina. I suggest it’s best to consult your doctor about the tapering dose and switching time.

lisa
6:33 pm September 2nd, 2016

Hi. I was a heroin addict for two years then went on subutex and did really well. Unfortunately I got on it again and have been on a methadone programme for 3 years. How long would it take to feel normal and have the methadone out of my system? I’m on 40 ml a day and want to get off it. Is it dangerous to just stop?

Lydia @ Addiction Blog
12:35 pm September 9th, 2016

Hi Lisa. I suggest that you speak with your doctor to help you plan an individualized tapering schedule.

Rachel
7:02 am September 17th, 2016

I have been in a methadone clinic about an hr. Away from my house (even though there is one 5min away) for 6 years. I don’t go to any clinic that i might know someone so i don’t get stuck in a difficult situation , which seems very unlikly anymore. After being successful in receiving all my take homes for numerous years now. I have been in this clinic for 6 years so I have 6 years of clean drug screens, attendance, groups, 1on1’s ect.. So I have been slowly tapering off of metadone for almost 2 years. I am now just sick of this “groundhogs day” affect it has on my life and mu families lives. I had 2 children on methadone and feel like my life is aimed in a completely different direction now and for awhile. I don’t talk or see anyone I know does drugs or did them with me,So no more people (even my children’s father was never an opiate user). I stay away from any places that are bad and since i have children that helps plus i have no need to go to bad area’s I don’t talk ore know anyone. Lastly the things part sort of went away with the friends and once being a parent became my #1 job. So after knowing this much I wanted to ask your opinion on how fast I can detox off of the last 75ish mg. I was @ a whopping 235mg a day for a few years. I have been coming down 5mg 3 weeks ago, 2 weeks ago i put in for 3 mg decrease, and this week I put in a request for 5mg decrease which will come into affect this week. I started to have stomach cramping this morning but it went away by noon. So if anyone could give me advice on how other people came off or what is recommended or if something should be given to help with some of the withdraw symptoms. I asked everyone who works at my clinic and no one has any answers or how others were successful. Thank you for your help it will be greatly appreciated.
Thank you, Rachel
The 29 year old who is sick of the repetitious 1 day a week, its got to be over before I’m 30 next year.

Roger
8:38 am October 14th, 2016

What is the standard decrease of methadone in miligrams when tapering or detoxing a patient on a stable dose of 140 mg. of “Roxanne Methadone. ?

Lydia @ Addiction Blog
1:04 pm October 21st, 2016

Hi Roger. I suggest that you consult with your doctor to help you plan an individualized tapering schedule. Generally, the tapering schedule for methadone is:
– first decrease dose by 20-50% per day until you reach 30 mg/day
– then decrease by 5 mg/day every three to five days to 10 mg/day
– then decrease by 2.5 mg/day every three to five days

This not a strict schedule, so you may taper methadone more slowly if it’s hard for you. Here’s the reference source: http://www.healthquality.va.gov/guidelines/Pain/cot/OpioidTaperingFactSheet23May2013v1.pdf

Jennifer
4:40 pm October 31st, 2016

I have been on methadone continuously since 1981.I was 24 years old when I started and am now 59 . That’s, what, 35 years? I also used other opiates until 10 years ago. Methadone doesn’t seem to have caused any damage to me, other than to take away my body’s ability to produce its own endorphins. I should have said “physical” damage to me. I have been an absolute slave to this substance for all these years and don’t recommend that to anyone. Thankfully, I am on a dose of only 30mg. per day. My husband, who died of cancer three months ago, had a daily dose of 180 mg. This had nothing to do with the cancer, as he’d taken this amount for many years. This huge amount of methadone did, however, cause problems for him with pain management during the cancer for reasons too long to explain here. I now have chronic pain problems, but, were this not the case I would try to detox very, very slowly in order to finally free myself from this lifelong addiction. By the way, I live in Italy, where the clinics are government run and totally free. The doctors, nurses, and other staff are truly interested in the well-being of the people they serve, which is exactly the opposite of my long experience in the United States.

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